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Effect of chromium nicotinic acid supplementation on selected cardiovascular disease risk factors

Abstract

The effects of daily supplemental chromium (200 μg) complexed with 1.8 mg nicotinic acid on plasma glucose and lipids, including total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides, were assessed in 14 healthy adults and 5 adults with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) using a double-blind crossover study with 8-wk experimental periods. Eight of the 14 healthy subjects and all 5 subjects with NIDDM also underwent an oral glucose tolerance test with assessment of 90 min postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. No statistically significant effects of chromium nicotinic acid supplementation were found on plasma insulin, glucose, or lipid concentrations, although chromium nicotinic acid supplementation slightly lowered fasting plasma total and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose concentrations, and 90-min postprandial glucose concentrations in individuals with NIDDM.

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Thomas, V.L.K., Gropper, S.S. Effect of chromium nicotinic acid supplementation on selected cardiovascular disease risk factors. Biol Trace Elem Res 55, 297–305 (1996). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02785287

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02785287

Index Entries

  • Chromium
  • glucose
  • lipids
  • healthy adults
  • non-insulin-dependent diabetes