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Effects of text illustrations: A review of research

Abstract

Can illustrations aid learning of text material? These authors review the results of 55 experiments comparing learning from illustrated text with learning from text alone. They go on to look at research in closely related fields (involving, for example, nonrepresentational pictures, graphic organizers, learner-produced drawings) and conclude by offering guidelines for practice.

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Correspondence to W. Howard Levie.

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Levie, W.H., Lentz, R. Effects of text illustrations: A review of research. ECTJ 30, 195–232 (1982). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02765184

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Keywords

  • Reading Comprehension
  • Educational Psychology
  • Text Information
  • Poor Reader
  • Mental Imagery