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Prospects

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 151–166 | Cite as

Florence Nightingale (1820–1910)

  • Alex Attewell
Profiles of Famous Educators
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Conclusion

Florence Nightingale once quoted from an address on education delivered at the Universities of St Andrew's and Glasgow, which perfectly reflected her own standpoint: ‘[…] education is to teach men not to know, but to do’ (Nightingale, 1873, p. 576). It would seem fair to judge Florence Nightingale's contribution to education by the practical effect which her reforms had. A letter written to her by Benjamin Jowett should stand as her epitaph:

There was a great deal of romantic feeling about you 23 years ago when you returned home from the Crimea […] and now you work on in silence, and nobody knows how many lives are saved by your nurses in hospitals; how many thousand soldiers […] are now alive owing to your forethought and diligence; how many natives of India in this generation and in generations to come have been preserved from famine and oppression and the load of debt by the energy of a sick lady who can scarcely rise from her bed. The world does not know all this or think about it. But I know it and often think about it (31 December 1879).

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References

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Works by Florence Nightingale

  1. — 1851.The Institution of Kaiserswerth on the Rhine, for the practical training of deaconesses, under the direction of the Rev. Pastor Fliedner, embracing the support and care of a hospital, infant and industrial schools, and a female penitentiary. London, Colonial Ragged Training School. 32 p.Google Scholar
  2. — 1858a.Notes on matters affecting the health, efficiency and hospital administration of the British army founded chiefly on the experience of the late war. Presented by request to the Secretary of State for War. London, Harrison & Sons. 567 p.Google Scholar
  3. — 1858b.Subsidiary notes as to the introduction of female nursing into military hospitals in peace and in war. Presented by request to the Secretary of State for War, London, Harrison & Sons. 133 p.Google Scholar
  4. — 1859.Notes on hospitals: being two papers read before the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, at Liverpool, in October 1858. With evidence given to the Royal Commissioners on the State of the Army in 1857. London, John W. Parker & Sons. 108 p.Google Scholar
  5. — 1860a.Notes on nursing: what it is and what it is not. London, Harrison. 70 p.Google Scholar
  6. — 1860b.Suggestions for throught for searchers after religious truth. 3 vols. London, Eyre & Spottiswoode. (Privately printed).Google Scholar
  7. — 1863a.How people may live and not die in India. London, Emily Faithfull. 11 p.Google Scholar
  8. — 1863b.Notes on hospitals. Third edition. London, Longmans. 187 p.Google Scholar
  9. Florence Nightingale 1863c.Sanitary statistics of native and colonial schools and hospitals. London. 67 p.Google Scholar
  10. Florence Nightingale 1865.The organisation of nursing in a large town (an account of the Liverpool nurses'training school). With an introduction by Florence Nightingale. Liverpool. 103 p.Google Scholar
  11. Florence Nightingale 1867. ‘Suggestions on the subject of providing, training, and organizing nurses for the sick poor in workhouse infirmaries.In: Report of the committee on cubic space of metropolitan workhouses with papers submitted to the committee Parlimentary Blue Book, p. 64–79.Google Scholar
  12. — 1871.Introductory notes on lying-in institutions, together with a proposal for organising an institution for training midwives and midwifery nurses. By Florence Nightingale, London, Longmans, Green & Co. 110 p.Google Scholar
  13. — 1873a. A Note' of interrogation.Fraser's magazine. May, p. 567–77.Google Scholar
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  15. — 1874a.Life or death in India. A paper read at the meeting of the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, Norwich, October, 1873. With an appendix ‘life or death by irrigation’. London, Harrison & Sons. 63 p.Google Scholar
  16. Florence Nightingale 1874b.Suggestions for improving the nursing services of hospitals and on the method of training nurses for the sick poor. 18 p.Google Scholar
  17. — 1876.Metropolitan and National Association for providing trained nursing for the sick poor: on trained nursing for the sick poor. London, Spottiswoode & Co. 12 p.Google Scholar
  18. Florence Nightingale 1879. A missionary health officer in India.In: Good words, (three articles) July, August and September 1879, p. 492–96, p. 565–71, p. 635–40.Google Scholar
  19. Florence Nightingale 1882. ‘Nurses, training of’ and ‘Nursing the sick’.In: Quain's dictionary of medicine, p. 1038–43; p. 1043–49.Google Scholar
  20. — 1892. Three letters.In:Report of the training of rural health missioners and of their village lecturing and visiting under the Bucks County Council: 1891–92. Winslow, U.K., E.J. French. 50 p.Google Scholar
  21. — 1893. ‘Sick-nursing and health-nursing’.In:Woman's mission: a series of congress papers on the philanthropic work of women by eminent writers. London, Sampson Low, Marston & Co., p. 184–99.Google Scholar
  22. — 1894.Health teaching in towns and villages. Rural hygiene. London, Spottiswoode & Co. 27 p.Google Scholar
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Works about Florence Nightingale

  1. — Cook, E.T. 1913.The life of Florence Nightingale, 2 vols, London, Macmillan.Google Scholar
  2. — O'Malley, I.B. 1930.Florence Nightingale, 1820–1856. London, Thornton Butterworth. 416 p.Google Scholar
  3. — Woodham-Smith, C. 1992.Florence Nightingale. London, Constable.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© UNESCO 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex Attewell

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