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Discipline seen from below: Student rationales for non-compliance in secondary schools in the United States of America

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Authors

Additional information

Original language: English

Bradley A. Levinson (United States) Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina (1993). Assistant professor of education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at Indiana University. Conducted long-term ethnographic fieldwork at a Mexican scondary school, and is presently working on a manuscript,We are all equal: student culture and identity at a Mexican scondary school and bayond. Research interests include the comparative study of student culture in relation to school practices, popular culture and national identity. PublishedThe cultural production of the educated person: critical ethmographies of schooling and local practice (with D. Foley and D. Holland, 1996), as well as articles in several journals.

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Levinson, B.A. Discipline seen from below: Student rationales for non-compliance in secondary schools in the United States of America. Prospects 28, 601–615 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02736975

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02736975

Keywords

  • School Violence
  • School Practice
  • Structural Rationale
  • Student Subjectivity
  • Student Culture