Human Nature

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 353–379 | Cite as

Behavioral ecology of conservation in traditional societies

Article

Abstract

A common exhortation by conservationists suggests that we can solve ecological problems by returning to the attitudes of traditional societies: reverence for resources, and willingness to assume short-term individual costs for long-term, group-beneficial sustainable management. This paper uses the 186-society Standard Cross-Cultural Sample to examine resource attitudes and practices. Two main findings emerge: (1) resource practices are ecologically driven and do not appear to correlate with attitude (including sacred prohibition) and (2) the low ecological impact of many traditional societies results not from conscious conservation efforts, but from various combinations of low population density, inefficient extraction technology, and lack of profitable markets for extracted resources.

Key words

Cross-Cultural studies Ecology Resource attitudes Resource use 

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Copyright information

© Walter de Gruyter, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Natural Resources and EnvironmentUniversity of MichiganAnn Arbor

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