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Restoration of severely weathered wood

Abstract

Severely weathered window units were used to test various restoration methods and pretreatments. Sanded and unsanded units were pretreated with a consolidant or water repellent preservative, finished with an oil- or latex-based paint system, and exposed outdoors near Madison, WI, for five years. Pretreatments were applied to both window sashes (stiles and rails) and sills. In most cases, pretreatment with consolidants was detrimental to the finish. These pretreatments generally caused more flaking and cracking of the paint compared with that of untreated controls or penetrating water-repellent preservatives. The best results were obtained by a combination of sanding and pretreatment with a water-repellent preservative containing copper naphthenate or with tung oil.

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USDA Forest Service, One Gifford Pinchot Dr., Madison, WI, 53706-2398.

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Williams, R.S., Knaebe, M. Restoration of severely weathered wood. Journal of Coatings Technology 72, 43–51 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02698004

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02698004

Keywords

  • Wood Surface
  • Water Repellent
  • Severely Weather
  • Paint System
  • Forest Prod