Skip to main content

Wood properties affecting finish service life

Abstract

Wood is a biological material that has widely different properties depending on species, geographic area where the tree grew, the growth conditions, size of the tree at harvest, sawing, and other manufacturing processes. Some of the more important wood properties as they relate to wood finishing are discussed, e.g., growth rate, density, knots, extractives, juvenile wood, grain orientation, and weathering characteristics.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Browning, B.L., “The Wood-Water Relationship,” inThe Chemistry of Wood, Browning, B.L. (Ed.), InterScience, London, 1964.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Kollmann, F.F.P. and Côté, W.A.Principles of Wood Science and Technology, Vol. 1, Solid Wood, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1968.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Chudnoff, M.,Tropical Timbers of the World, Ag. Handbk. 607, USDA Forest Service, Washington, D.C., 1984.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Siau, J.F.,Transport Processes in Wood, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1984.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Siau, J.F.,Flow in Wood, Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, NY, 1971.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Skaar, C.,Water in Wood, Chapter 3, Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, NY, 1972.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Stamm, A.J.,Wood and Cellulose Science, Ronald Press, New York, 1964.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Forest Products Laboratory, “Wood Handbook: Wood as an Engineering Material,” Gen. Tech. Rep. FPL-GTR-113, USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, WI, 1999.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Williams, R.S., Knaebe, M.T., and Feist, W.C.,Finishes for Exterior Wood, Forest Products Society, Madison, WI, 1996.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Feist, W.C., “Finishing Exterior Wood,”Federation Series on Coatings Technology, Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology, Blue Bell, PA, 1996.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Browne, F.L., “Wood Properties that Affect Paint Performance,” FPL Report R1053, USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, WI, 1951.

    Google Scholar 

  12. MacCleery, D.W., “American Forests: A History of Resiliency and Recovery,” USDA Forest Service, Report FS-540, USDA Forest Service, Washington, D.C., and Forest History Society, Durham, NC, 1992.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Jourdain, C.J., Dwyer, J., Kersell, K., Mall, D., McClelland, K., Springate, R., and Williams, S., “Changing Nature of Wood Products-What Does it Mean for Coatings and Finish Performance,”Journal of Coatings Technology,71, No. 890, 61 (1999).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  14. Levitin, N., “Extractives of Red and White Pine and Their Effect on Painted Lumber,”Timber of Canada, June, 66 (1962).

  15. Donegan, V., et al. “A Headache Called Extractive Discoloration: Pointing to the Problem and Specifying Solutions,”Am. Paint. Contractor, June 1992.

  16. Williams, R.S., Winandy, J.E., and Feist, W.C., “Paint Adhesion to Weathered Wood,”Journal of Coatings Technology,59, No. 749, 43 (1987).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  17. Williams, R.S., Plantinga, P.L. and Feist, W.C., “Photodegradation of Wood Affects Paint Adhesion,”Forest Prod. J., 40, No. 1, 45 (1990).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  18. Arnold, A., Feist, W.C., and Williams, R.S., “Effect of Weathering of New Wood on the Subsequent Performance of Semitransparent Stains,”Forest Prod. J., 42, No. 3, 10 (1992).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  19. Williams, R.S. and Feist, W.C., “Effect of Preweathering, Surface Roughness, and Wood Species on the Performance of Paint and Stains,”Journal of Coatings Technology,66, No. 828, 109 (1994).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  20. Evans, P.D., Thay, P.D., and Schmalzl, K.J., “Degradation of Wood Surfaces During Natural Weathering. Effects on Lignin and Cellulose and on the Adhesion of Acrylic Primers,”Wood Sci. Technol., 30, No. 6, 411 (1996).

    Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  21. Underhaug, Å., Lund, T.J., and Kleive, K., “Wood Protection—The Interaction Between Substrate and the Influence on Durability,”J. Oil & Colour Chemists’ Assoc., 66, No. 11, 345 (1983).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  22. Miller, E.R., “Chemical Aspects of External Coatings for Softwoods,” Symposium on Chem. Aspects of Wood Tech., Swedish Forest Prod. Res. Lab., Södergam, Stockholm, 1981.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Bravery, A.F. and Miller, E.R., “The Role of Pre-treatment in the Finishing of Exterior Softwood,”Proc. of the Ann. Conv. of the British Wood Pres. Assoc., p. 14–23 (1980).

  24. Boxall, J., “Painting Weathered Timber,” Information Sheet 20/77, Building Research Establishment, Princes Risborough Laboratory, Alyesbury, Bucks, England, 1977.

    Google Scholar 

  25. Shurr, G.G., “Proper Coatings for Wood Exteriors,”Am. Paint. Contractor, 12, 18 (1969).

    Google Scholar 

  26. Desai, R.L., “Coating Adhesion to Weathered Wood,” Eastern Forest Products Laboratory, Ottawa, Canada,Bi-Monthly Research Notes, 23, No. 5, 36 (1967).

    Google Scholar 

  27. Kleive, K., “Weathered Wooden Surfaces—Their Influence on the Durability of Coating Systems,”Journal of Coatings Technology,58, No. 740, 39 (1986).

    Google Scholar 

  28. Richter, K., Feist, W.C., and Knaebe, M.T., “The Effect of Surface Roughness on the Performance of Finishes. Part 1. Roughness Characterization and Stain Performance,”Forest Prod. J., 45, No. 7/8, 91 (1995).

    Google Scholar 

  29. Williams, R.S. and Feist, W.C., “Durability of Paint or Solid-Color Stain Applied to Preweathered Wood,”Forest Prod. J., 43, No. 1, 8 (1993).

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  30. National Association of Home Builders,Housing Facts, Figures and Trends, NAHB, Washington, D.C., 1997.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Additional information

Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pinchot Dr., Madison, WI 53705-2398.

405 Enfrente Dr., Ste. 200, Novato, CA 94949.

727 Norristown Rd., Spring House, PA 19477-0904.

823 W. Blackhawk, Chicago, IL 60622.

The use of trade or firm names in this publication is for reader information and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Agriculture of any product or service.

The Forest Products Laboratory is maintained in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin. This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and it is therefore in the public domain and not subject to copyright.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Williams, R.S., Jourdain, C., Daisey, G.I. et al. Wood properties affecting finish service life. Journal of Coatings Technology 72, 35–42 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02698003

Download citation

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02698003

Keywords

  • Wood Surface
  • Wood Property
  • Juvenile Wood
  • Fiber Saturation Point
  • Forest Prod