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Science policies to innovation strategies: “Local” networking and coping with internationalism in the developing country context

Abstract

The science and technology policy perspectives followed by most developing countries during the 1980s exhibited enormous problems in coping with the incoming economic reforms of liberalization, privatization and a changing international S&T scenaria. This article critically explores the S&T policy perspectives of India, a typical example of a developing country. In an effort to render the local scientific and technological capacities more meaningful and effective in relation to the market locale, this article puts forward the concept of networking in S&T (TENs) as a “new” innovation strategy for S&T policies in the context of developing countries.

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He is heading a research group on sociology of science and contemporary history of science programs at the National Institute of Science, Technology and Development Studies, New Delhi. Presently, he is a visiting scientist at the ORSTOM (Science, Technology and Development Group) and the Maison des sciences De l’Homme, Paris, completing a volume on the Emergence of Scientific Communites in the Developing Countries.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and not of the organization he represents. An earlier version of the article was presented at the 4S/EASST Joint Conference on Science, Technology and Development, 2–4 August 1992, in Gothenburg, Sweden. I wish to acknowledge and thank Dr. E.K. Hicks, Dr. R. Aravanitis, Dr. A. Jain and Dr. D. Abrol for their valuable input and suggestions. I would also like to thank my colleague, Mr. Wahid, for his timely help in processing this article.

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Krishna, V.V. Science policies to innovation strategies: “Local” networking and coping with internationalism in the developing country context. Knowledge and Policy 6, 134–157 (1993). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02696286

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Keywords

  • Market Locale
  • Science Policy
  • Innovation Strategy
  • Technology Policy
  • Policy Sector