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Eco-culture, development, and architecture

Abstract

This article examines the prospects for an authentic regional architecture in the light of alternative development paradigms. It is argued that the failure of orthodox development strategies and the domination of western culture, including architecture, over non-Western cultures, is due to fundamental imbalances between northern and southern economic structures. By contrast, ecodevelopment, appropriate technology and regional architecture all represent significant devolutionary movements toward a global “eco-culture.” A cultural typology placing eco-culture in historical perspective is outlined. It is concluded that, to be fully effective, changes in development patterns in the south have to be matched by equivalent cultural changes in the North.

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He has taught at universities in many parts of the world, including North and South America, the Far East and the Middle East. He has written on the theory and criticism of contemporary architecture in both the developed and developing world. His books includeTransformations, Roberts Press, Malta (1987), andRenault Centre: Norman Foster, Architecture Design and Technology Press (1991).

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Abel, C. Eco-culture, development, and architecture. Knowledge and Policy 6, 10–28 (1993). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02696280

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Keywords

  • Building Type
  • Consumer Culture
  • Regional Architecture
  • Intermediate Technology
  • Colonial Culture