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R&D and economic growth

Abstract

This paper examines the association between research and development (R&D) and the growth rate of output per capita at a national level. Do countries that allocate a larger share of output to R&D grow faster than otherwise similar countries? After reviewing past literature, I examine the association between R&D and economic growth in 20 OECD countries using a multivariate regression. There is not found to be a strong association between the two. But when considering only G-7 countries, there is reported to be a positive association between industry R&D expenditures and economic growth.

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His research interests involve examining the determinants of economic growth and income inequality within nations. His latest paper is entitled "Income Inequality, Education Expenditures, and Growth" and can be found in the Journal of Development Economics 63 (2000), pp. 379–398.

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Sylwester, K. R&D and economic growth. Know Techn Pol 13, 71–84 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02693991

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02693991

Keywords

  • Economic Growth
  • Human Capital
  • Productivity Growth
  • Total Factor Productivity
  • OECD Country