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Failure mechanisms of automotive side glazing in rollover collisions

  • Stephen A. Batzer
Features Performance

Abstract

The failure mechanisms of tempered and laminated side glazing (windows) in automobile rollover collisions are analyzed. It is shown that the glazing performance is directly dependent on the window material, mounting hardware, and framing design. The mechanism analysis is supplemented with examples from actual rollovers and the results of experiments. An overview is given of current occupant-retention glazing technology that is designed to keep the occupant in the vehicle during a collision.

Keywords

Prevention Volume Laminate Glass Side Window National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Highway Traffic Safety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ASM International 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen A. Batzer
    • 1
  1. 1.Engineering InstituteFarmington

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