Toward a more structured use of information technology in the research community

Abstract

Information technology has great potential for supporting the activities of research networks. However, some fundamental problems must first be addressed to determine whether the technological support is necessary at all. Once that need has been determined, merely installing a set of isolated, generic information tools is not sufficient to address the full spectrum of network information needs. Therefore, a comprehensive and customized network information system is required. We argue that a specification method can help to structure the development of such an information system.

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Correspondence to Aldo de Moor.

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Aldo de Moor finished his M.Sc. in information management in 1993, after which he worked at the University of Guelph, Canada, on the initiation of the Global Research Network on Sustainable Development. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. at Tilburg University.

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de Moor, A. Toward a more structured use of information technology in the research community. Am Soc 27, 91–101 (1996). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02692000

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Keywords

  • Research Network
  • Computer Support Cooperative Work
  • Information Tool
  • Computer Support Collaborative Learn
  • Information System Development