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Current Psychology

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 297–303 | Cite as

Food-related stimuli increase desire to eat in hungry and satiated human subjects

  • Kelly Gurley Lambert
  • Tara Neal
  • Jill Noyes
  • Conway Parker
  • Pamela Worrel
Articles

Abstract

In the present study, the effect of food-related cues on the desire to eat chocolate in hungry and satiated subjects was investigated. Subjects (n=46) were randomly assigned to either a hungry or satiated group and then assigned to a group receiving one of the following stimuli: taste (2 M&Ms), sight (a photograph of M&Ms), cognition (a passage describin M&Ms), or control (no stimulus). In each testing session, subjects rated their desire to eat chocolate before and after the 90-s presentation of the particular stimulus. Each subject was then given a half pound of M&Ms so that actual consumption could also be measured. Results indicated that, following the presentation of the sight and taste stimuli, the subjects’ desire to eat chocolate was significantly increased. Furthermore, no differences in chocolate consumption due to state of hunger or type of food-related stimulus presented were found.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorder Current Psychology Taste Stimulus Maladaptive Eating 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Transaction Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kelly Gurley Lambert
    • 1
  • Tara Neal
    • 1
  • Jill Noyes
    • 1
  • Conway Parker
    • 1
  • Pamela Worrel
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of PsychologyRandolph-Macon CollegeAshland

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