Skip to main content

Secondary information services: Mirrors of scholarly communication. Forces and trends

Abstract

The statistics published each year by U.S. secondary publishers reveal trends in scientific communication, including political, economic, and social factors. For the first time since 1957, the number of documents abstracted and indexed by U.S. secondary services has declined—following thirty-five years of often rapid growth. The author traces the history of abstracting and indexing services in the United States, considers reasons that the coverage of secondary services has stabilized, and discusses why comprehensive coverage of the scholarly literature may no longer be a viable strategy for secondary services to follow in the years ahead.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Kaser, R.T. Secondary information services: Mirrors of scholarly communication. Forces and trends. Publishing Research Quarterly 11, 10–24 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02680443

Download citation

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02680443

Keywords

  • Scholarly Literature
  • Comprehensive Coverage
  • Indexing Service
  • Printing Press
  • Primary Publisher