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Ichthyological Research

, Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 245–257 | Cite as

Growth and morphological development of larval and juvenileepinephelus bruneus (perciformes: Serranidae)

  • Yoshifumi Sawada
  • Keitaro Kato
  • Tokihiko Okada
  • Michio Kurata
  • Yoshio Mukai
  • Shigeru Miyashita
  • Osamu Murata
  • Hidemi Kumai
Article

Abstract

The growth and morphological development of larval and juvenileEpinephelus bruneus were examined in a hatchery-reared series. Average body length (BL) of newly-hatched larvae was 1.99 mm, the larvae growing to an average of 3.96 mm by day 10, 6.97 mm by day 20, 12.8 mm by day 30, 22.1 mm by day 40 and 24.7 mm by day 45 after hatching. Newly-hatched larvae had many mucous cells in the entire body epidermis. By about 4 mm BL, the larvae had developed pigment patterns peculiar to epinepheline fishes, including melanophores on the dorsal part of the gut, on the tips of the second dorsal and pelvic fin spines, and in a cluster on the ventral surface of the tail. Spinelets on the second dorsal and pelvic fin spines, the preopercular angle spine and the supraocular spine, had started to develop by about 6 mm BL. The notochord tip was in the process of flexion in larvae of 6–8 mm BL, by which time major spines, pigments and jaw teeth had started to appear. Fin ray counts had attained the adult complement at 10 mm BL. After larvae reached 17 mm BL, elements of juvenile coloration in the form of more or less densely-pigmented patches started to appear on the body. Squamation started at 20 mm BL. Major head spines had disappeared or became relatively smaller and lost their serrations by 20–25 mm BL.

Key words

Epinephelus bruneus growth morphological development larva juvenile 

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Copyright information

© The Ichthyological Society of Japan 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshifumi Sawada
    • 1
  • Keitaro Kato
    • 1
  • Tokihiko Okada
    • 1
  • Michio Kurata
    • 1
  • Yoshio Mukai
    • 1
  • Shigeru Miyashita
    • 1
  • Osamu Murata
    • 1
  • Hidemi Kumai
    • 1
  1. 1.Fisheries Laboratory of Kinki UniversityWakayamaJapan

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