Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society

, Volume 68, Issue 1, pp 56–58 | Cite as

Estimation of heat of combustion of triglycerides and fatty acid methyl esters

  • Kanit Krisnangkura
Article

Abstract

Equations were developed for the estimation of gross heat of combustion (HG) of triglycerides (TGs) and fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from their saponification number (SN) and iodine value (IV). HG of TG=1,896,000/SN − 0.6 IV — 1600 and HG of FAME=618,000/SN − 0.08 IV — 430. When these equations were tested on cottonseed oil, soybean oil, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil, sunflower oil methyl esters, soybean oil methyl esters and cottonseed oil methyl esters, predicted HG values agreed well with those reported in the literature.

Key words

Heat of combustion iodine number samponification number vegetable oil vegetable oil methyl ester 

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Copyright information

© The American Oil Chemists’ Society 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kanit Krisnangkura
    • 1
  1. 1.Biotechnology Division, School of Energy and MaterialsKing Mongkut’s Institute of Technology ThonburiBangkokThailand

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