ZDM

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 85–87 | Cite as

Ethnomathematics as a fundamental of instructional methodology

  • Lawrence Shirley
Analyses

Abstract

Over the past two or three decades, various political, cultural, and educational forces have brought ethnomathematics and multiculturalism in general into widespread use. Thus, it is important to include ethnomathematical studies in teaching methodology and especially teacher education programs.

ZDM-Classification

D30 

Ethmomathematik als Grumdlage der Unterrichts-methodologie

Kur zreferat

In den letzten 20–30 Jahren haben verschiedene Kräfte aus Politik, Kultur sowie Bildung und Eiziehung für eine weitverbreitete Nutzung ethnomathematischer und multikultureller Ideen gesorgt. Es ist von daher wichtig, Ethnomathematik in den Unterricht und insbesondere in Lehrebildungsprogramme zu integrieren.

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Copyright information

© ZDM 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence Shirley
    • 1
  1. 1.Mathematics DepartmentTowson UniversityTowsonUSA

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