Language and reading: Some perceptual prerequisites

Conclusion

Since Orton first noted the communicative and perceptual deficits of reading impaired children, many investigators have attempted to delineate in more detail the nature of perceptual impairment in children with language and reading disabilities. Considerable advances in our knowledge concerning the manner in which speech is processed as a code have occurred since Orton’s time. These advances have made it possible to demonstrate a more direct link between perceptual deficits and the development of communication skills, including reading.

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Tallal, P. Language and reading: Some perceptual prerequisites. Bulletin of the Orton Society 30, 170–178 (1980). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02653716

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Keywords

  • Reading Disability
  • Speech Sound
  • Dyslexia
  • Dyslexic Child
  • Speech Stimulus