Advertisement

Journal of the American Oil Chemists Society

, Volume 50, Issue 12, pp 513–515 | Cite as

Analysis of soybean lecithin by thin layer and analytical liquid chromatography

  • W. L. Erdahl
  • A. Stolyhwo
  • O. S. Privett
Technical

Abstract

The application of thin layer and analytical liquid chromatography to the analysis of two samples of commercial soybean lecithins is described. A combination of column chromatography and quantitative thin layer chromatography showed that these products consisted of ca. 82% mixture of the major phospholipids of soybeans, phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl ethanolamine, and phosphatidyl inositol. The remainder of these products contained essentially the entire spectrum of lipid classes found in soybean oil-some 24 known and unknown glycolipids and phospholipids, in addition to the neutral lipids. Applications of analytical liquid chromatography to these lecithins gave a composition profile of the lipid classes comparable to two-dimensional thin layer chromatography. The potential of this method for the complete analysis of complex lipids, such as soybean lecithins, is indicated.

Keywords

Lecithin Neutral Lipid Lipid Class Analytical Liquid Chromatography Phosphatidyl Inositol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Food Chemicals Codex National Academy of Science, National Research Council Publication 1143:599 (1962). Official and Tentative Methods of Analysis of the American Oil Chemists' Society, Section J.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Szuhaj, B.F., Balazs, I.L. and L.D. Williams, Paper 175, World Congress, American Oil Chemists' Society and International Society for Fat Research, Chicago, Ill., September 1970.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Rouser, R., G. Kritchevsky and A. Yamamoto, in “Lipid Chromatographic Analysis,” Vol. 1, Edited by G.V. Marinetti, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, N.Y., 1967, pp. 99–161.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lepage, M., J. Chromatogr. 13:99 (1964).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Privett, O.S., K.A. Dougherty and J.D. Castell, Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 24:1265 (1971).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Renkonen, O., and P. Varo, in “Lipid Chromatographic Analysis,” Vol. 1, Edited by G.V. Marinetti, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, N.Y., 1967, p. 41.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Dittmer, S.C., and R.L. Lester, J. Lipid Res. 5:126 (1964).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Skipski, V.P., and M. Barclay, in “Methods of Enzymology,” Edited by J.M. Lowenstein, Academic Press, New York, N.Y., 1969, p. 542.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Blank, M.L., J.A. Schmit and O.S. Privett, JAOCS 41:371 (1964).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Stolyhwo, A., and O.S. Privett, J. Chromatogr. Sci. 11:20 (1973).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Stolyhwo, A., W.L. Erdahl and O.S. Privett, J. Chromatogr. Sci. 11:263 (1973).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Privett, O.S., K.A. Dougherty, W.L. Erdahl and A. Stolyhwo, JAOCS 50:516 (1973).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The American Oil Chemists' Society 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. L. Erdahl
    • 1
  • A. Stolyhwo
    • 1
  • O. S. Privett
    • 1
  1. 1.The Hormel InstituteUniversity of MinnesotaMinnesotaAustin

Personalised recommendations