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Using visits to interactive science and technology centers, museums, aquaria, and zoos to promote learning in science

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Journal of Science Teacher Education

Abstract

This article received the “Implications of Research for Educational Practice” award at the 1995 meeting of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science. The award is made possible by Carolina Biological Supply. An adaptation of this article, entitled “Don’t Compare, Complement: Making Best Use of Science Centres and Museums,” was published in the 1995 Set: Research Information for Teachers, Number 1, Item 1, by the New Zealand and Australian Councils for Education Research.

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Rennie, L., McClafferty, T. Using visits to interactive science and technology centers, museums, aquaria, and zoos to promote learning in science. J Sci Teacher Educ 6, 175–185 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02614639

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