Systems practice

, Volume 10, Issue 5, pp 509–532 | Cite as

Lewin's conflict in marriage revisited and expanded: Implications for interprofessional social service collaboratives

  • Ken Udas
Papers
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Abstract

In this paper Kurt Lewin's notions of conflict in social systems are applied to interprofessional social service and education collaboratives. Interprofessional collaboration and service integration are parts of a larger reform effort addressed at reconfiguring and rethinking the ways that social service and educational systems are designed, services are delivered, and professionals are prepared. Constructs including privacy, cultural variance, group potency, need divergence, needs saturation, and tension are related and discussed in terms of generic group-life and the interprofessional collaborative. The discussion points to potential sources of tension and conflict in social systems and factors that may be influenced to reduce tension.

Key words

collaboration conflict field theory need saturation social systems tension 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ken Udas
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of ManagementUniverzita KomenskéhoBratislavaSlovak Republic

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