Advertisement

Primates

, Volume 41, Issue 2, pp 185–188 | Cite as

Chest-rubbing in captive woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha)

  • Brent C. White
  • Stephanie E. Dew
  • James R. Prather
  • MaryJo Stearns
  • Eric Schneider
  • Steve Taylor
Short Communication

Abstract

The correlates of chest-rubbing were studied in a captive group of woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha) to assess possible functions of territorial marking, spacing among competing groups or competing males, reproductive communication, marking to identify familiar environments, selfanointing, and displacement activity. Chest-rubbing was observed only in sexually mature monkeys and was a predominantly male activity. Females increased chest-rubbing when the original adult male died. Chest-rubbing by the first adult male was more common during the two months that he was mating with two females and at times when keepers were likely to be at the exhibit. The results suggest a reproductive function for chest-rubbing in both males and females. There is also support for chest-rubbing as a spacing activity.

Key words

Woolly monkeys Lagothrix lagotricha Chest-rubbing Marking behavior Reproductive behavior 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Defler, T. R. 1996. Aspects of the ranging pattern in a group of wild woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagothricha).Amer. J. Primatol., 39: 289–302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Eisenberg, J. F. 1976. Communication mechanisms and social integration in the black spider monkey,Ateles fusciceps robustus, and related species.Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology, 213: 1–108.Google Scholar
  3. Epple, vG.;Lorenz, R. 1967. Vorkommen, morphologie und function der sternaldruse bei den Platyrrhini.Folia Primatol., 7: 98–126.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Kavanagh, M.;Dresdale, L. 1975. Observations on the woolly monkey (Lagothrix lagotricha) in northern Colombia.Primates, 16: 285–294.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Neville, M. K.;Glander, K. E.;Braza, F.;Rylands, A. B. 1988. The howling monkeys, genusAlouatta. In:Ecology and Behavior of Neotropical Primates,Mittermeier,R. A.;Rylands,A. B.;Coimbra-Filho,A. F.;da Fonseca,G. A. B. (eds.), World Wildlife Fund, Washington, D.C., pp. 349–453.Google Scholar
  6. Nishimura, A. 1990. A sociological and behavioral study of woolly monkeys,Lagothrix lagotricha, in the upper Amazon.The Science and Engineering Review of Doshisha Univ., 31: 87–121.Google Scholar
  7. Thiessen, D.;Rice, M. 1976. Mammalian scent gland marking and social behavior.Psychol. Bull., 83: 505–539.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Williams, L. 1967.Man and Monkey, J.B. Lippincott, New York.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brent C. White
    • 1
  • Stephanie E. Dew
    • 1
  • James R. Prather
    • 2
  • MaryJo Stearns
    • 3
  • Eric Schneider
    • 4
  • Steve Taylor
    • 4
  1. 1.Psychobiology ProgramCentre CollegeKentuckyDanvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychological and Brain SciencesUniversity of LouisvilleKentuckyLouisvilleUSA
  3. 3.Fossil Rim Wildlife RanchGlen RoseUSA
  4. 4.Louisville Zoological GardenLouisvilleUSA

Personalised recommendations