Oil & Soap

, Volume 21, Issue 10, pp 307–309 | Cite as

Effect of deodorization and antioxidants on the stability of lard

  • R. W. Riemenschneider
  • S. F. Herb
  • E. M. Hammaker
  • F. E. Luddy
Article

Summary

DEODORIZATION produced no appreciable increase in the stability of steam-rendered lard but significantly increased the stability of kettlerendered lard. A substantial increase in the stability of lard was produced by tocopherol, regardless of whether it was added as a pure compound, as a concentrate, or as a tocopherol-bearing oil. Accelerated tests showed that this increase was more than doubled when small amounts of synergists also were added. Deodorization of the lard prior to addition of the synergistic antioxidant compositions produced even greater stability.

Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was more effective than tocopherol as an antioxidant for lard, as determined by both the active oxygen and the oxygen-absorption methods. Deodorization of the lard prior to addition of this antioxidant and synergists did not effect further increase in stability over that obtained by the addition of these materials to undeodorized lard.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References cited

  1. (1).
    Newton, R. C., and Grettie, D. P., U.S. Patent 1,903,126 (1933).Google Scholar
  2. (2).
    Grettie, D. P., Oil and Soap10, 126 (1933).Google Scholar
  3. (3).
    Olcott, H. S., and Mattill, H. A., J. Am. Chem. Soc.,58, 1627 (1936).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. (4).
    Olcott, H. S., and Emerson, O. H., J. Am. Chem. Soc.,59, 1008 (1937).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. (5).
    Olcott, H. S., Oil and Soap,18, 77 (1941).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. (6).
    Golumbic, C., and Mattill, H. A., J. Biol. Chem.,134, 535 (1940).Google Scholar
  7. (7).
    Golumbic, C., and Mattill, H. A., J. Am. Chem. Soc.63, 1142 (1941).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. (8).
    Riemenschneider, R. W., Turer, J., Wells, P. A., and Ault, W. C., Oil and Soap,21, 47 (1944).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. (9).
    Lundberg, W. O., Halvorson, H. O., and Burr, G. O., Oil and Soap,21, 33 (1944).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. (10).
    United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry Circular Letter No. 2354, December 26, 1941.Google Scholar
  11. (11).
    Private communication stating that individual requests for permission to add lecithin to lard or “rendered pork fat” have been granted.Google Scholar
  12. (12).
    War Food Administration Meat Inspection Division Memorandum No. 25, Dec. 11, 1943.Google Scholar
  13. (13).
    War Food Administration Meat Inspection Division Memorandum No. 29, Feb. 10, 1944.Google Scholar
  14. (14).
    Lee, A. P., and King, W. G., Jr., Oil and Soap,14, 263 (1937).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. (15).
    Bailey, A. E., Ind. Eng. Chem.,33, 404 (1941).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. (16).
    Bailey, A. E., and Feuge, R. O., Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed.,15, 280 (1943).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. (17).
    Parker, W. E., and McFarlane, W. D., Can. J. Res.,18B, 405 (1940).Google Scholar
  18. (18).
    Riemenschneider, R. W., Turer, J., and Speck, R. M., Oil and Soap,20, 169 (1943).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. (19).
    Johnston, W. R., and Frey, C. N., Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed.,13, 479 (1941).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. (20).
    Swern, D., Stirton, A. J., Turer, J., and Wells, P. A., Oil and Soap20, 224 (1943).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The American Oil Chemists’ Society 1944

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. W. Riemenschneider
    • 1
  • S. F. Herb
    • 1
  • E. M. Hammaker
    • 1
  • F. E. Luddy
    • 1
  1. 1.Eastern Regional Research LaboratoryPhiladelphia

Personalised recommendations