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Humans and pets as sources of salmonellae

Abstract

Reported non-typhoid salmonella infections in man have increased in the United States from 723 in 1946 to 20,040 in 1966, and this may represent only 1% of the salmonella infections actually occurring. The temporary carrier state following infections in man represents an important source for the spread of infection to other persons. Pets including dogs, cats, Easter chicks and ducklings, and turtles can also be a source of human salmonella infections. Approximately 15–20% of normal household dogs may be infected with salmonellae, although documented human infections traced to dogs are rare. Pet Easter chicks and ducklings have been incriminated frequently as a source of infection in young children. More than 100 cases of salmonellosis have been traced to pet turtles. Only by the implementation of appropriate control measures attacking each one of these potential sources of infection can we hope to reduce the increasing incidence of salmonellosis in the United States.

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Deceased, March 19, 1968.

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Galton, M.M. Humans and pets as sources of salmonellae. J Am Oil Chem Soc 46, 230–232 (1969). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02544803

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Keywords

  • Typhoid Fever
  • Food Handler
  • Turtle Pond
  • Salmonella Infection
  • Rectal Swab Culture