Lipids

, Volume 2, Issue 2, pp 122–126 | Cite as

Metabolic conversions and the positional distributions in liver lecithin of some unnatural dienoic acids in the rat

  • Howard W. Sperecher
  • H. J. Dutton
  • F. D. Gunstone
  • Ralph T. Holman
Article

Abstract

The metabolism of 9,15-octadecadienoate, 12,15-octadecadienoate and 7,13-eicosadienoate was investigated in the fatdeficient rat. The liver lecithins of those animals receiving 9,15- and 12,15-octadecadienoate, as well as the animal remaining on the fat-deficient control, were isolated. The fatty acid distributional pattern was determined by the use of lecithinase A. All three of the experimental dienoic acids were incorporated into tissue lipids. None of the acids, however, was converted to longer chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The 9,15-octadecadienoate was esterified almost exclusively to the β-position of lecithin, whereas 12,15-octadecadienoate was about equally distributed between the α- and β-positions.

Keywords

Lecithin Linoleate Methyl Linoleate Tissue Lipid Dienoic Acid 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Mead, J. F., and D. H. Howton, J. Biol. Chem.229, 575–582 (1957).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Rahm, J. J., and R. T. Holman, J. Nutr.84, 149–154 (1964).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Fulco, A. J., and J. F. Mead, J. Biol. Chem.234, 1411–1416 (1959).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Klenk, E., and H. Mohrhauer, Z. Physiol. Chem., Hoppe-Seyler's320, 218–233 (1960).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Mead, J. F., Federation Proc.20, 952–955 (1961).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Klenk, E., and H. Pfluger, Z. Physiol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler's335, 53–62 (1963).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Holman, R. T., Federation Proc.23, 1062–1067 (1964).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Klenk, E., JAOCS42, 580–582 (1965).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Gunstone, F. D., and P. J. Sykes, J. Chem. Soc. 3055–3058 (1962).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Schlenk, H., and J. L. Gellerman, Anal. Chem.32, 1412–1414 (1960).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Lindlar, H., Helv. Chim. Acta35, 446–450 (1952).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Scholfield, C. R., E. P. Jones, R. O. Butterfield and H. J. Dutton, Anal. Chem.35, 1588–1591 (1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Mohrhauer, H., and R. T. Holman, J. Lipid Res.4, 151–159 (1963).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Folch, J., M. Lees and G. H. Sloane-Stanley, J. Biol. Chem.226, 497–509 (1957).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Stoffel, W., F. Chu and E. H. Ahrens, Anal. Chem.31, 307–308 (1957).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Hofstetter, H. H., N. Sen and R. T. Holman, JAOCS42, 537–540 (1965).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Long, C., and I. F. Penny, Biochem. J.65, 382–389 (1957).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Schlenk, H., N. Sen and D. M. Sand, Biochim. Biophys. Acta70, 708–710 (1963).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Rahm, J. J., and R. T. Holman, J. Nutr.84, 15–19 (1964).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Mead, J. F., and W. H. Slaton, J. Biol. Chem.219, 705–709 (1956).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Klenk, E., in “Advances in Lipid Research,”3, 1–23 (1965).Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Rahm, J., and R. T. Holman, J. Lipid Res.5, 169–176 (1964).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Schlenk, H., D. M. Sand and N. Sen, Biochim. Biophys. Acta84, 361–364 (1964).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Reiser, R., N. L. Murty and H. Rakoff, J. Lipid Res.3, 56–59 (1962).Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Brenner, R. R., O. Mercuri and M. E. DeThomas, J. Nutr.77, 203–209 (1962).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Takagi, T., Bull. Chem. Soc. Japan38, 2055–2057 (1965).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Lands, W. E. M., J. Biol. Chem.235, 2233–2237 (1960).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Lands, W. E. M., and I. Merkl, Ibid.238, 898–904 (1963).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Johnson, R. M., and T. Ito, J. Lipid Res.6, 75–79 (1965).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© American Oil Chemists’ Society 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard W. Sperecher
    • 1
  • H. J. Dutton
    • 2
  • F. D. Gunstone
    • 3
  • Ralph T. Holman
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Physiological ChemistryOhio State UniversityColumbus
  2. 2.Northern Regional Research LaboratoryUS Department of AgriculturePeoria
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryUniversity of St. AndrewsSt. AndrewsScotland
  4. 4.The Hormel InstituteUniversity of MinnesotaAustin

Personalised recommendations