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Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 164, Issue 3, pp 231–234 | Cite as

Effect of carbon source and pH of the growth medium on spore germination inPhycomyces blakesleeanus

  • Guadalupe Martínez-Cadena
  • Jorge Saavedra-Calixto
  • Griselda Messina-Valencia
  • Graciela Domínguez-Gutiérrez
  • Guadalupe Novoa-Martínez
Short Communication

Abstract

Phycomyces blakesleeanus sporangiospores responded differently to activation by physical and chemical stimuli. Spores that were physically (heat shock) activated or chemically (ammonium acetate) activated germinated and grew at pH 4.5 with the hexoses glucose, fructose, galactose, andN-acetylglucosamine, and with glycerol and amino acids. Under these conditions, physically activated spores showed a lower, although significant growth with the hexoses fructose, galactose,N-acetylglucosamine and with glycerol. On the other hand, physically activated spores incubated at alkaline pH (pH 7.3) required glucose to germinate; a requirement not observed with chemically activated spores, which showed significant growth in the other hexoses tested. Both physically and chemically activated spores incubated at pH 7.3 were unable to germinate and grow with amino acids and glycerol. These results suggest that there are different targets for activation of the spores by physical and chemical treatments. The levels of the fermentative enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase and of the oxidative enzyme NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase were higher in cells grown at pH 4.5 in medium containing glucose; however, alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase appear not to be affected by a change in the pH of the growth medium.

Key words

Spore activation Phycomyces Carbon source pH 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guadalupe Martínez-Cadena
    • 1
  • Jorge Saavedra-Calixto
    • 1
  • Griselda Messina-Valencia
    • 1
  • Graciela Domínguez-Gutiérrez
    • 1
  • Guadalupe Novoa-Martínez
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto de Investigación en Biología Experimental, Facultad de QuímicaUniversidad de GuanajuatoGuanajuatoMexico

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