Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society

, Volume 73, Issue 11, pp 1549–1555 | Cite as

Fuel properties and emissions of soybean oil esters as diesel fuel

  • David Y. Z. Chang
  • Jon H. Van Gerpen
  • Inmok Lee
  • Lawrence A. Johnson
  • Earl G. Hammond
  • Stephen J. Marley
Article

Abstract

The effects of using blends of methyl and isopropyl esters of soybean oil with No. 2 diesel fuel were studied at several steady-state operating conditions in a four-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine. Fuel blends that contained 20, 50, and 70% methyl soyate and 20 and 50% isopropyl soyate were tested. Fuel properties, such as cetane number, also were investigated. Both methyl and isopropyl esters provided significant reductions in particulate emissions compared with No. 2 diesel fuel. A blend of 50% methyl ester and 50% No. 2 diesel fuel provided a reduction of 37% in the carbon portion of the particulates and 25% in the total particulates. The 50% blend of isopropyl ester and 50% No. 2 diesel fuel gave a 55% reduction in carbon and a 28% reduction in total particulate emissions. Emissions of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons also were reduced significantly. Oxides of nitrogen increased by 12%.

Key Words

Biodiesel diesel engine engine emissions engine performance fuel properties isopropyl ester methyl soyate particulate emissions winterization 

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Copyright information

© AOCS Press 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Y. Z. Chang
    • 1
  • Jon H. Van Gerpen
    • 1
  • Inmok Lee
    • 2
  • Lawrence A. Johnson
    • 2
  • Earl G. Hammond
    • 2
  • Stephen J. Marley
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringIowa State UniversityAmes
  2. 2.Center for Crops Utilization Research and Department of Food Science and Human NutritionIowa State UniversityAmes
  3. 3.Department of Agriculture and Biosystems EngineeringIowa State UniversityAmes

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