Biological effects of static magnetic fields on the microcirculatory blood flowin vivo: a preliminary report

  • S. Ichioka
  • M. Iwasaka
  • M. Shibata
  • K. Harii
  • A. Kamiya
  • S. Ueno
Other Physiological Measurement and Modelling

Abstract

There have been few studies of the effect of static magnetic fields on microcirculatory haemodynamics in vivo. The rat skinfold transparent chamber technique was used, which provides an excellent means of observing and quantifying direct in vivo microvascular haemodynamic responses to static magnetic fields up to 8 T. An intravital videomicroscope was used to measure the changes in blood flow before and after exposure to a magnetic field for 20 min in a horizontal type superconducting magnet with a bore 100 mm in diameter and 700 mm long. After exposure, microcirculatory blood flow showed an initial increase for about 5 min followed by a gradual decrease and a return to the control value. It is hypothesised that these changes represent rebound hyperaemia following reduced blood flow during exposure.

Keywords

Magnetic field exposure Superconducting magnet High-intensity magnetic field Microcirculation Haemodynamics In vivo measurement Rat transparent chamber Intravital microscope 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Beischer, D. E. andKnepton, J. C. (1964): ‘Influence of strong magnetic fields on the electrocardiogram of squirel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)’,Aerospace Med.,35, pp. 939–944Google Scholar
  2. Chen, I. I. H. andSuha, S. (1984): ‘Analysis of an intensive magnetic field on blood flow’,J. Bioelectricity,3, pp. 293–298Google Scholar
  3. Gimitrov, J. andGimitrova, A. (1992): ‘Effects of a static magnetic field on hemodynamics during administration of a cell membrane calcium channel blocking agent’,Electro-Magnetobiol.,11, pp. 91–95Google Scholar
  4. Gimitrov, J., Ohkubo, C., Yamada, S., Gmitrova, A. andXu, S. (1995): ‘Static magnetic field effects on sinocarotid baroreceptors in rabbits exposed under conscious conditions’,Electro-Magnetobiol.,14, pp. 217–228Google Scholar
  5. Hori, K., Suzuki, M., Abe, I., Saito, S. andSato, H. (1981): ‘New technique for measurement of microvascular pressure in normal and tumor vessels of rats’,Invasion Metastasis,1, pp. 248–260Google Scholar
  6. Intaglietta, M., Silverman, N. R. andTompkins, W. R. (1975): ‘Capillary flow velocity measurementin vivo andin situ by television methods’,Microvas. Res.,10, pp. 165–179CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Jeherson, P., Duboc, D., Levergne, T., Guize, L., Guerin, F., Degorges, M. andSyrota, A. (1988): ‘Changes in human cardiac rhythm induced by a 2-T static magnetic field’,Radiology,166, pp. 227–230Google Scholar
  8. Keltner, J. R., Roos, M. S., Brakeman, P. R. andBudinger, T. F. (1990): ‘Magnetohydrodynamics of blood flow’,Magnet. Reson. Med.,16, pp. 139–149Google Scholar
  9. Ketchen, E. E., Porter, W. E. andBolton, N. E. (1978): ‘The biological effects of magnetic fields on man’,Am. Ind. Hyg. Assoc. J.,39, pp. 1–11.Google Scholar
  10. Kinouchi, Y., Yamaguchi, H. andTenforde, T. S. (1996): ‘Theoretical analysis of magnetic field interactions with aortic blood flow’,Bioelectromagnetics,17, pp. 21–32CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Klimovskaia, L. D. andSmirnova, N. P. (1975): ‘Autonomic reaction in rabbits exposed to constant magnetic field (Russian)’,Kosm. Biol. Aviakosm. Med.,9, pp. 18–22Google Scholar
  12. Mayrovitz, H. N. andLarsen, P. B. (1992): ‘Effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on skin microvascular blood perfusion’,Wounds,4, pp. 197–202Google Scholar
  13. Miura, M. andOkada, J. (1991): ‘Non-thermal vasodilatation by radio frequency burst-type electromagnetic field radiation in the frog’,J. Physiol. (Lond),435, pp. 257–273Google Scholar
  14. Starmer, C. F., McIntosh, H. D. andWhalen, R. E. (1971): ‘Electrical hazards and cardiovascular function’,N. Engl. J. Med.,284, pp. 181–186CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Sud, V. K. andSekhon, G. S. (1989): ‘Blood flow through the human arterial system in the presence of a steady magnetic field’,Phys. Med. Biol.,34, pp. 795–805CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Tenforde, T. S., Gaffey, C. T., Moyer, B. R. andBudinger, T. F. (1983): ‘Cardiovascular alterations in macaca monkeys exposed to stationary magnetic fields—experimental observations and theoretical analysis’,Bioelectromagnetics,4, pp. 1–9Google Scholar
  17. Ueno, S., Lovsund, P. andOberg, P. A. (1986): ‘Effects of alternating magnetic fields and low-frequency electric currents on human skin blood flow’,Med. Biol. Eng. Comput.,24, pp. 57–61CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© IFMBE 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Ichioka
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Iwasaka
    • 2
  • M. Shibata
    • 2
  • K. Harii
    • 1
  • A. Kamiya
    • 2
  • S. Ueno
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Plastic Surgery, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Medical Electronics, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations