Development of a non-invasive treatment system for urinary incontinence using a functional continuous magnetic stimulator (FCMS)

Abstract

A system composed of a functional continuous magnetic stimulator (FCMS) and a saddle-type coil has been developed for non-invasive treatment of urinary incontinence, especially stress incontinence and urge incontinence. The FCMS conditions were as follows: 2 kW maximum electrical power consumption, 800 V maximum capacitor voltage, 720 μs pulsewidth (180 μs rise time), and 5–30 Hz frequency. A frequency between 5 and 10 Hz is used to treat urge incontinence and a frequency between 25 Hz and 30 Hz is used to treat urge incontinence. The coil (120 mm long, 90 mm wide and 50 mm thick) fits the most suitable region for this treatment, the region from the anus to the perineum. The coil is cooled to maintain a coil temperature between 20 and 25°C so that it can be used efficiently and safely. In experiments with anaesthetised dogs, it was confirmed that the urethral pressure increased when the circumference of the perineum received continuous magnetic stimulation of 720 μs pulsewidth (180 μs rise time), 10Hz frequency and about 520 V capacitor voltage. This result suggests that magnetic stimulation can be effective as a urinary incontinence therapy.

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Ishikawa, N., Suda, S., Sasaki, T. et al. Development of a non-invasive treatment system for urinary incontinence using a functional continuous magnetic stimulator (FCMS). Med. Biol. Eng. Comput. 36, 704 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02518872

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Keywords

  • Urinary incontinence
  • Stress incontinence
  • Urge incontinence
  • Urethral closure
  • Therapy
  • Continuous stimulation
  • Magnetic stimulation
  • Coil
  • Eddy current
  • Non-invasive
  • Low power