Enzymatic extraction of mustard seed and rice bran

  • R. Sengupta
  • D. K. Bhattacharyya
Article

Abstract

Aqueous enzymatic extraction was investigated for recovery of oil from mustard seed and rice bran. The extraction process was reproducible based on statistical analysis of extraction data under different extraction conditions. The most significant factors for extraction were the time of digestion with enzymes, seed or bran concentration in water, volume of hexane added before recovery, and amount of enzyme(s) used. The pretreatment steps of each material before enzyme digestion influenced oil yield.

Quality of enzyme-extracted mustard oil was better with respect to color and odor than commercial expeller-extracted and Soxhlet-extracted oils. Most of the characteristics of rice bran oil were identical to those of commercial solvent-extracted oils, but rice bran oil had a lower content of colored substances and higher acidity (free fatty acid). Enzymatic extraction led to recovery of a protein concentrate with increased protein and reduced fiber and ash contents in the mustard and rice bran meals.

Key Words

Cellulase enzymatic extraction mustard seed pectinase protein rice brain 

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Copyright information

© AOCS Press 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Sengupta
    • 1
  • D. K. Bhattacharyya
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical TechnologyUniversity Colleges of Science and TechnologyCalcuttaIndia

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