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Researches on Population Ecology

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 219–224 | Cite as

Effect of organic rice farming on planthoppers 4. Reproduction of the white backed planthopper,Sogatella furcifera Horváth (Homoptera: Delphacidae)

  • Tatsuto Kajimura
  • I Nyoman Widiarta
  • Kazuya Nagai
  • Kenji Fujisaki
  • Fusao Nakasuji
Original Paper

Abstract

The reproduction ofSogatella furcifera was investigated in a chemically fertilized rice field and an organically farmed field. In the latter, the density of immigrants was significantly higher, while the settling rate of female adults and the survival rate of immature stages of ensuing generations were lower. The number of eggs laid by a female of the invading and following generations was smaller, and the percentage of brachypterous females in the next generation was also lower. Consequently, the density of nymphs and adults in the ensuing generations decreased in the organically farmed field. For an experimental comparison, potted rice plants were cultivated using seedlings and soil from the chemically fertilized or the organically farmed fields. WhenSogatella furcifera was reared on these plants, both the reproductive rate and the appearance rate of brachypterous female adults were lower in the organic treatment. Egg hatchability was also lower in the organic treatment. This experiment suggested that a specific nutritional condition in rice plants suppressed the population ofS. furcifera in the organically farmed field.

Key words

Sogatella furcifera organic farming nutrition population reproduction ecology 

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Copyright information

© the Society of Population Ecology 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tatsuto Kajimura
    • 1
  • I Nyoman Widiarta
    • 3
  • Kazuya Nagai
    • 2
  • Kenji Fujisaki
    • 1
  • Fusao Nakasuji
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of AgricultureOkayama UniversityOkayamaJapan
  2. 2.Okayama Prefectural Agricultural Experiment StationOkayamaJapan
  3. 3.Sukamandi Research Insititute for RiceWest JavaIndonesia

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