Advertisement

Journal of Anesthesia

, Volume 8, Issue 4, pp 410–414 | Cite as

Lumbar epidural buprenorphine for postoperative pain relief following hepatectomy

  • Takekazu Terai
  • Hidekazu Yukioka
  • Osamu Morimoto
  • Mitsugu Fujimori
Original Articles

Abstract

The induction of postoperative pain relief with lumbar epidural or intramuscular buprenorphine was studied in 30 patients undergoing hepatectomy. When patients first complained of pain after surgery, 0.06 mg or 0.12 mg of buprenorphine in 10 ml or 20 ml of saline was administered through an epidural catheter inserted at the L3-4 interspace, or 0.12 mg was administered intramuscularly. Two of seven patients receiving epidural buprenorphine 0.12 mg in 10 ml saline were completely pain-free, and the other five patients in this group had only slight pain. Four of eight patients receiving epidural buprenorphine 0.12 mg in 20 ml saline were completely pain-free, and the other four patients in this group had only slight pain. Epidural buprenorphine 0.06 mg in 20 ml saline and intramuscular buprenorphine 0.12 mg each yielded only incomplete analgesia. The duration of analgesia of epidural buprenorphine 0.12 mg administered at the lumbar level was about 8 h. There were no significant changes over time in circulatory or respiratory variables induced by buprenorphine. No patient had serious adverse effects. Lumbar epidural administration of buprenorphine 0.12 mg diluted to 10 or 20 ml (20 ml might be preferable) with saline is recommended for induction of postoperative analgesia following hepatectomy.

Key words

Epidural analgesia Buprenorphine Hepatectomy Postoperative pain 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Yukioka H, Fujimori M (1992) Epidural opioids for postoperative pain relief following hepatectomy. Osaka City Med J 38:67–77PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Benumof JL (1987) Anesthesia for thoracic surgery. Saunders, Philadelphia, pp 467–476Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Cahill J, Murphy D, O'Brien D, et al. (1983) Epidural buprenorphine for pain relief after major abdominal surgery. Anaesthesia 38:760–764PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lanz E, Simko G, Theiss D, et al. (1984) Epidural buprenorphine—A double-blind study of postoperative analgesia and side effects. Anesth Analg 63:593–598PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Birnbach DJ, Johnson MD, Arcario T, et al. (1989) Effect of diluent volume on analgesia produced by epidural fentanyl. Anesth Analg 68:808–810PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Matsunaga M, Dan K, Higa K, et al. (1984) Epidural or intravenous buprenorphinc for postoperative pain relief (in Japanese with English abstract). Masui (Jpn J Anesthesiology) 33:995–1002PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Knape JTA (1986) Early respiratory depression resistant to naloxone following epidural buprenorphine. Anesthesiology 64:382–384PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Jensen FM, Jensen NH, Holk IK, et al. (1987) Prolonged and biphasic respiratory depression following epidural buprenorphine. Anaesthesia 42:470–475PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© JSA 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takekazu Terai
    • 1
  • Hidekazu Yukioka
    • 1
  • Osamu Morimoto
    • 1
  • Mitsugu Fujimori
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care MedicineOsaka City University Medical SchoolOsakaJapan

Personalised recommendations