Researches on Population Ecology

, Volume 21, Issue 2, pp 197–216 | Cite as

Population dynamics of some phytophagous mites and their predators on goldenrodSolidago altissima L.

I. Seasonal trends in population numbers and spatial distributions
  • Akio Takafuji
Article

Keywords

Natural Enemy Population Trend Prey Population Mite Species Predacious Mite 

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References

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Copyright information

© The Society of Population Ecology 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akio Takafuji
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Applied Entomology, College of AgricultureOkayama UniversityOkayamaJapan

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