Advertisement

Researches on Population Ecology

, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 317–324 | Cite as

Genetic correlation of wing polymorphism between females and males in the oriental chinch bug,Cavelerius saccharivorus Okajima (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae)

  • Kenji Fujisaki
Article

Summary

Genetic correlations of the wing form and the relative wing length between females and males were estimated in the oriental chinch bug,Cavelerius saccharivorus, by calculating the correlation between the sexes of the proportion macropterous or the mean relative wing length in full-sib families obtained from different wing forms of parents emerged in a high density population. There was a significantly positive genetic correlation between the sexes in both the proportion macropterous and the mean relative wing length. However, the appearance rate of macropters tended to be much lower in males than in females under the rearing conditions which promote the appearance of macropters. This was evident especially in the offspring of brachypterous parents. These indicated that inC. saccharivorus the wing polymorphism of males is not a simple result of the genetic correlation of wing morphology between the two sexes. It was considered that both of the female and male fitness advantages to wing reduction, as well as the genetic correlation between the sexes, would influence the evolution of wing polymorphism in this species.

Keywords

Cavelerius saccharivorus wing polymorphism genetic correlation between sexes relative wing length male fitness advantage 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Crespi, B. J. (1986) Territoriality and fighting in a colonial thrips,Hoplothrips pedicularius, and sexual dimorphism in Thysanoptera.Ecol. Ent. 11: 119–130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Fujisaki, K. (1985) Ecological significance of the wing polymorphism of the oriental chinch bug,Cavelerius saccharivorus Okajima (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae).Res. Popul. Ecol. 27: 125–136.Google Scholar
  3. Fujisaki, K. (1986) Genetic variation of density responses in relation to wing polymorphism in the oriental chinch bug,Cavelerius saccharivorus Okajima (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae).Res. Popul. Ecol. 28: 219–230.Google Scholar
  4. Fujisaki, K. (1989a) Morphometric traits of adults of the oriental chinch bug,Cavelerius saccharivorus Okajima (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae), in relation to its wing polymorphism.Appl. Entomol. Zool. 24: 20–28.Google Scholar
  5. Fujisaki, K. (1989b) Wing form determination and sensitivity of stages to environmental factors in the oriental chinch bug,Cavelerius saccharivorus Okajima (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae).Appl. Entomol. Zool. 24: 287–294.Google Scholar
  6. Fujisaki, K. (1992) A male fitness advantage to wing reduction in the oriental chinch bug,Cavelerius saccharivorus Okajima (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae).Res. Popul. Ecol. 34: 173–183.Google Scholar
  7. Harrison, R. G. (1980) Dispersal polymorphisms in insects.Ann. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 11: 95–118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Ôshiro, Y. (1981) Studies on the population dynamics of the oriental chinch bug,Cavelerius saccharivorus (Okajima) (Heteroptera, Lygaeidae) in the sugarcane field. Part 2. Effects of temperature, day length and population density on the appearance of the macropterous adult.Kontyû 49: 385–389. (in Japanese with English summary).Google Scholar
  9. Roff, D. A. and D. J. Fairbairn (1991) Wing dimorphisms and the evolution of migratory polymorphisms among the insecta.Amer. Zool. 31: 243–251.Google Scholar
  10. Roff, D. A. and D. J. Fairbairn (1994) The evolution of alternate morphologies: fitness and wing morphology in male sand crickets.Evolution (in press).Google Scholar
  11. Wagner, D. L. and J. K. Liebherr (1992) Flightlessness in insects.Tree 7: 216–220.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Society of Population Ecology 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenji Fujisaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of AgricultureOkayama UniversityOkayamaJapan

Personalised recommendations