Advertisement

Theoretical and Experimental Chemistry

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 42–47 | Cite as

New products and reaction pathways for the reaction of dimethylsulfoxide with peroxonitrite in aqueous solutions

  • V. L. Lobachev
  • G. P. Zimtseva
  • E. S. Rudakov
  • Yu. V. Geletii
Article
  • 26 Downloads

Abstract

The first observed basic products of the reaction of dimethylsulfoxide with peroxonitrite were methyl nitrite and methane with pH=7 and methyl nitrate at pH>10. The dependence of the yield of these and other reaction products on pH, concentrations of the substrate and peroxonitrite, and the additives NO 2 and CO2 was studied. It is proposed that CH4 and CH3ONO are formed in the reaction between DMSO and the cis-form ofOONO, while DMSO2 and CH3ONO2 are formed in reactions with the trans-form ofOONO or the dimer HOONO/OONO respectively.

Keywords

DMSO Neutral Condition Nitromethane Volatile Product Homolysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J. S. Beckman, T. W. Beckman, G. Chen, et al.,Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA,87, 1620–1624 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    R. M. Uppi, G. L. Squadrito, and W. A. Pryor,Arch. Biochem. Biophys.,327, No. 2, 335–343 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    J. H. M. Tsai, T. Q. Harrison, J. C. Martin, et al.,J. Am. Chem. Soc.,116, No. 10, 4115–4116 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    M. N. Hughes and H. G. Nicklin,J. Chem. Soc., A, No. 2, 450–452 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    W. H. Koppenol, J. J. Moreno, W. A. Pryor, et al.,Chem. Res. Toxicol.,5, No. 6, 834–842 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    C. E. Richerson, P. Mulder, V. W. Bowry, and K. U. Ingold,J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, No. 29, 7211–7219 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    L. H. Johanson and L. A. Borg,Anal. Biochem.,174, No. 2, 331–336 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    R. A. Alberty,J. Phys. Chem.,99, 11028–11034 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    R. E. Huie,Toxicology,89, 193–216 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    R. Kisser, T. Nanser, P. Bugnon, et al.,Chem. Res. Toxicol.,10, No. 10, 1285–1291 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. L. Lobachev
    • 1
  • G. P. Zimtseva
    • 1
  • E. S. Rudakov
    • 1
  • Yu. V. Geletii
    • 2
  1. 1.L. M. Litvinenko Institute of Physical Organic and Coal ChemistryNational Academy of Sciences of UkraineDonetskUrkaine
  2. 2.Institute for Problems of Chemical PhysicsRussian Academy of SciencesChemogolovskaRussia

Personalised recommendations