American Journal of Community Psychology

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 355–388 | Cite as

Development and validation of adolescent-perceived microsystem scales: Social support, daily hassles, and involvement

  • Edward Seidman
  • LaRue Allen
  • J. Lawrence Aber
  • Christina Mitchell
  • Joanna Feinman
  • Hirokazu Yoshikawa
  • Katherine Anne Comtois
  • Judith Golz
  • Robin L. Miller
  • Blanca Ortiz-Torres
  • Gillian Carty Roper
Article

Abstract

Developed and validated instruments for urban and culturally diverse adolescents to assess their self-reported transactions with family, peer, school, and neighborhood microsystems for the constructs of social support, daily hassles, and involvement. The sample of 998 youth were from schools in three Eastern cities with high percentages of economically disadvantaged youth. Data were collected before and after the transition to junior high school or to senior high school. Blacks constituted 26%, whites 26%, and Latinos 37% of the sample. Factor analyses confirmed and enhanced the hypothesized four-factor microsystem factor structure for support, hassles, and involvement; internal consistency and stability coefficients were consistent with these structures. In general, the microsystem factors were common across gender, ethnicity, and age. However, when group differences did occur on these demographic variables, they tended to validate the salience of microsystem specificity. In contrast to the total scores, the microsystem-specific factors yielded more meaningful and differential information with regard to demographic differences and the mediating processes across a school transition.

Key Words

at-risk adolescents microsystem measures social support daily hassles participation 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward Seidman
    • 4
  • LaRue Allen
    • 4
  • J. Lawrence Aber
    • 1
  • Christina Mitchell
    • 2
  • Joanna Feinman
    • 4
  • Hirokazu Yoshikawa
    • 4
  • Katherine Anne Comtois
    • 3
  • Judith Golz
    • 4
  • Robin L. Miller
    • 4
  • Blanca Ortiz-Torres
    • 4
  • Gillian Carty Roper
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Health Sciences CenterUniversity of ColoradoUSA
  3. 3.University of MarylandUSA
  4. 4.Adolescent Pathways Project, Center for Community Research and Action, Psychology Department, Room 277New York UniversityNew York

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