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Pediatric Cardiology

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 169–174 | Cite as

Longitudinal observations of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension in children using echocardiography

  • H. Nagasawa
  • Y. Arakaki
  • O. Yamada
  • T. Nakajima
  • T. Kamiya
Original Articles

Abstract

Previous studies have evaluated left ventricular dimensions in children using two-dimensional echocardiography, but there is little information on gender differences and on the longitudinal development of the dimensions of the left ventricle. Our objective was to asses, by two-dimensional echocardiography, the normal size of the left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVDd) in children, its differences by sex, and the rate of its development using height, weight, and body surface area as indices. The study group consisted of 437 patients (264 males, 173 females) with a history of Kawasaki disease but with no coronary artery lesions, as determined by repeated echocardiographic and other examinations. A total of 1595 examinations were done over an average of 6.7 years. The increase in LVDd was significantly more rapid in (1) children below 2 years of age than in older children of either sex and (2) in males who were 11 and 12 years old than in males who were 10 years old. Significant gender differences were observed in the increase in LVDd by all indices (p<0.001).

Key words

Echocardiogram Left ventricular end-diastolic dimension Longitudinal development Sex difference 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Nagasawa
    • 1
  • Y. Arakaki
    • 1
  • O. Yamada
    • 1
  • T. Nakajima
    • 1
  • T. Kamiya
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsNational Cardiovascular CenterSuita, OsakaJapan

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