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Soviet Mining

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 274–278 | Cite as

Dynamics of the bed of an apron conveyer

  • O. A. Baikonurov
  • A. A. Zarubinskii
Mechanization and Automation in Mining
  • 15 Downloads

Conclusions

  1. 1.

    The dynamicity coefficient increases with increasing height of fall and with decreasing weight of the falling load.

     
  2. 2.

    Analysis of (17) confirms the predictions of the theory of collision, that when a load is suddenly applied, i.e., when H=0, the dynamicity coefficient is equal to two.

     
  3. 3.

    As the falling weight decreases, there is a decrease in the effect of the relative rigidity on the dynamicity coefficient. For the transporation of large, heavy ore fragments, the relative rigidity can be taken as 900–950 N/m.

     
  4. 4.

    The dynamicity coefficient decreases with increasing plate thickness.

     
  5. 5.

    From experiments on 6 mm plates with characteristics close to the industrial values, we can recommend that they dynamicity coefficient in this case should be in the range 3–5.

     

Keywords

Dynamic Force Relative Deformation Maximum Flexure Bridge Circuit Dynamicity Coefficient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literature Cited

  1. 1.
    Metalworkers' Handbook [in Russian], Vol. 2, Mashgiz, Moscow (1958).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    N. I. Karyakin, K. N. Bystrov, and P. S. Kireev, A Short Reference Book of Physics [in Russian], “vysshaya shkola,” Moscow (1963).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    N. K. Snitko, The Dynamics of Structures [in Russian], Gosstroiizdat, Leningrad-Moscow (1960).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. A. Baikonurov
  • A. A. Zarubinskii

There are no affiliations available

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