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Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 125, Issue 2, pp 159–162 | Cite as

Effect of lipopolysaccharides of various composition from gram-negative bacteria on macrophage activity, oxidant metabolism, and microsomal activity of the liver

  • S. V. Sibiryak
  • S. A. Sergeeva
  • T. G. Khlopushina
  • N. N. Kurchatova
  • R. Sh. Yusupova
Microbiology and Immunology

Abstract

The study explores the effect of lipopolysaccharides of various composition from Gram-negative bacteria on phagocytic activity and oxygen-dependent metabolism of macrophages, intensity of lipid peroxidation, and activity of microsomal enzymes in mouse liver, and production of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor by cultured peripheral blood mononuclears. It is found that the magnitude of inhibiting effect of lipopolysaccharides on microsomal oxidation is a mirror reflection of the degree of their prooxidant effect and activation of phagocytic and secretory macrophage functions, which confirms tight coupling of these processes under conditions of acute phase response.

Key Words

bacterial lipopolysaccharides microsomal oxidation macrophage activity 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. V. Sibiryak
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. A. Sergeeva
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. G. Khlopushina
    • 1
    • 2
  • N. N. Kurchatova
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Sh. Yusupova
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Immunology and ImmunopharmacologyRussian Center of Eye and Plastic SurgeryUfa
  2. 2.Institute of PharmacologyRussian Academy of Medical SciencesMoscow

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