Advertisement

Research in Higher Education

, Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 43–55 | Cite as

Enforcing academic rules in higher education: A total quality management approach

  • Paul Burgar
Article

Abstract

Two key principles of total quality management (TQM) are increasing customer satisfaction and driving out fear. Enforcing academic rules, however, frequently induces fears and lowers student satisfaction. This case study shows how TQM was used in an MBA program to prevent infractions rather than punish students. Prevention became possible only after TQM techniques revealed the causes of rule violation. Techniques included run charts, forecasting, cause and effect analysis, multiple regression, customer surveys, and breaking down barriers between departments. Follow-up shows no new rule infractions for several academic terms.

Keywords

High Education Control Chart Total Quality Management Registration Form Rule Violation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Box, G., and G. Jenkins (1976).Time Series Analysis: Forcasting and Control. San Francisco: Holden Day.Google Scholar
  2. Chaffee, E. (1991)Total Quality Management: A Guide for the North Dakota University System. Bismarck: North Dakota State University Publications Services Office.Google Scholar
  3. Cherland, R. (May 1992). Total quality management: Statistics and graphics II—Control Charts. Paper presented at the Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum, Atlanta, GA.Google Scholar
  4. Coate, L. (1991). Implementing total quality management in a university setting. In L. A. Sherr and D. J. Teeter (eds.)New Directions for Institutional Research: No. 71. Total Quality Management in Higher Education (pp. 27–38). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  5. Cohen, J. (1988).Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences, 2nd ed. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  6. Cohen, J., and P. Cohen (1975).Applied Multiple Regression/Correlation Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences, New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  7. DeCosmo, R., J. Parker, and M. Heverly (1991). Total quality goes to community college. In L. A. Sherr and D. J. Teeter (eds.),New Directions for Institutional Research: No. 71. Total Quality Management in Higher Education (pp. 13–25). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  8. Deming, W. (1986).Out of the Crisis. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  9. Deming, W. (August, 1992). Quality concepts to solve societal crises: Profound knowledge for psychologists. Paper presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  10. Ealey, L. (1988).Quality by Design: Taguchi Methods and U.S. Industry Dearborn, MI: American Supplier Institute.Google Scholar
  11. Frost, J., and G. Beach (May 1992). Using a total quality management team to improve student information publications. Paper presented at the Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum, Atlanta, GA.Google Scholar
  12. Huff, A. (1993) Flowcharts and procedures. Unpublished manuscript, Georgia College, Robins Graduate Center, Warner Robins, Georgia.Google Scholar
  13. Huge, E. (ed.) (1990)Total Quality: An Executive's Guide for the 1990's (The Ernst & Young Quality Improvement Consulting Group). Homewood: Business One Irwin.Google Scholar
  14. Imai, M. (1986).Kaizen: The Key to Japan's Competitive Success. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  15. Ishikawa, K. (1985).What is Total Quality Control? The Japanese Way. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  16. Juran, J., F. Gryna, and R. Bingham (1974).Quality Control Handbook, 3rd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  17. Kepner, C., and B. Tregoe (1981).The New Rational Manager. Princeton: Princeton Research Press.Google Scholar
  18. Robertson, G. (1989).Quality Through Statistical Thinking: Improving Process Control and Capability. Dearborn, MI: American Supplier Institute Press.Google Scholar
  19. Sashkin, M., and K. Kiser (1993)Putting Total Quality Management to Work San Francisco: Berrett-Kohler Publishers.Google Scholar
  20. Scherkenbach, W. (1992)The Deming Route of Quality and Productivity: Road Maps and Roadblocks. Washington, DC: CEEPress Books, George Washington University.Google Scholar
  21. Shainin, D., and P. Shainin (1988). Statistical process control. In J. Juran and F. Gryna (eds.)Juran's Quality Control Handbook, 4th ed. (pp. 24.1–24.40). New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  22. Sherr, L. (1989). Is there a better way to manage higher education? Keynote address at the Annual Convention of the Association for Institutional Research, Baltimore. Transcribed in E. Chaffee (ed.),Total Quality Management: A Guide for the North Dakota University System. Bismarck: North Dakota State University Publications Services Office.Google Scholar
  23. Simon, H. (1977).The New Science of Management Decision. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  24. Taguchi, G. (1986).Introduction to Quality Engineering. Tokyo: Asian Productivity Organization.Google Scholar
  25. Walton, M. (1986)The Deming Management Method. New York: Putnam.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Burgar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ManagementGeorgia CollegeMilledgeville

Personalised recommendations