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Radiation Medicine

, Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 1–8 | Cite as

Perineural spread in head and neck malignancies

  • Hiroya Ojiri
Review

Abstract

Perineural tumor spread (PNS) of head and neck malignancies is a well-known form of metastatic disease in which a lesion can migrate away from the primary site along the endoneurium or perineurium. This pattern of spread may create a poor prognosis and require aggressive treatment when curable. Although representative histologies are squamous cell carcinoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma, other malignancies such as malignant lymphoma and sarcoma also can show such a specific pattern of extent. PNS can be insidious, often delaying diagnosis. Knowledge of anatomy of the nerves is crucial in the imaging diagnosis of PNS, to detect early curable disease. The facial nerve and the maxillary and mandibular divisions of the trigeminal nerve are most commonly affected. General clinical issues and the diagnostic imaging of PNS along these nerves are discussed in the current article.

Keywords

Parotid Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Mandibular Canal Inferior Alveolar Nerve Infraorbital Nerve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Japan Radiological Society 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroya Ojiri
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyJiker University School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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