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Histochemistry and Cell Biology

, Volume 106, Issue 2, pp 209–214 | Cite as

Connexin 43 and the glucose transporter, GLUT1, in the ciliary body of the rat

  • Bo-Chul Shin
  • Takeshi Suzuki
  • Shigeyasu Tanaka
  • Akio Kuraoka
  • Yasaburo Shibata
  • Kuniaki Takata
Original Paper

Abstract

To investigate the relationship between the gap junction protein connexin 43 and the glucose transporter GLUT1, their localization was visualized by double-immunofluorescence microscopy using frozen sections as well as immunogold staining of ultrathin frozen sections. In pigmented epithelial cells, most of the GLUT1 was localized along the plasma membrane facing the blood vessels, whereas in non-pigmented epithelial cells. it was present along the plasma membrane facing the aqueous humor. Connexin 43 was abundant in the ciliary body and localized mainly in the gap junctions connecting the pigmented and non-pigmented epithelial cells. Localization of GLUT1 and connexin 43 in the blood-aqueous barrier suggests that GLUT1, connexin 43, and GLUT1 disposed in this order could be a machinery responsible for the transport of glucose across the blood-aqueous barrier.

Keywords

Aqueous Humor Ciliary Body Ciliary Body Epithelium Ultrathin Freeze Section Immunogold Detection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bo-Chul Shin
    • 1
  • Takeshi Suzuki
    • 1
  • Shigeyasu Tanaka
    • 1
  • Akio Kuraoka
    • 2
  • Yasaburo Shibata
    • 2
  • Kuniaki Takata
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Morphology, Institute for Molecular and Cellular RegulationGunma UniversityMaebashi, GunmaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Anatomy, Faculty of MedicineKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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