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Surgery Today

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 95–97 | Cite as

Combined coronary artery bypass, mitral valve plasty, and abdominal aneurysmectomy in an 80-year-old patient: Report of a case

  • Taijiro Sueda
  • Kazumasa Orihashi
  • Satoru Morita
  • Kenji Okada
  • Masafumi Sueshiro
  • Shinji Hirai
  • Yuichiro Matsuura
Case Reports
  • 35 Downloads

Abstract

An 80-year-old man suffering from angina on exertion due to stenosis of the left main coronary artery, heart failure due to mitral valve regurgitation, and an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was successfully operated on with simultaneous surgical procedures. A coronary cineangiography revealed 90% stenosis of the left main coronary artery in segment 5, and 99% and 90% stenosis in segments 2 and 4AV, respectively, of the right coronary artery. Left ventriculography and aortography showed moderate mitral valve regurgitation and the presence of a fusiform-shaped AAA with a maximum diameter of 6 cm. It was thought that insertion of an intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) would prove difficult due to AAA; therefore, simultaneous surgery combining triple coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), mitral valve plasty, and prosthetic replacement of the AAA was undertaken. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and subsequent angiography showed good patency of all coronary bypass grafts and the abdominal prosthesis, along with the disappearance of mitral regurgitation. This patient's clinical course suggests that an extended surgical procedure is effective for the treatment of complicated cardiovascular disease, even in very elderly patients.

Key Words

CABG abdominal aneurysmectomy one-stage approach elderly patient 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Taijiro Sueda
    • 1
  • Kazumasa Orihashi
    • 1
  • Satoru Morita
    • 1
  • Kenji Okada
    • 1
  • Masafumi Sueshiro
    • 1
  • Shinji Hirai
    • 1
  • Yuichiro Matsuura
    • 1
  1. 1.First Department of SurgeryHiroshima University, School of MedicineHiroshimaJapan

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