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Brain Tumor Pathology

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 19–21 | Cite as

Video-enhanced microscopic visualization of apoptotic cell death caused by anti-Fas antibody in living human glioma cells

  • Seiji Ohta
  • Jun Yoshida
  • Seiji Yamamoto
  • Kenichi Uemura
  • Toshihiko Wakabayashi
  • Masaaki Mizuno
  • Takashi Sakurai
  • Susumu Terakawa
Original Article
  • 67 Downloads

Abstract

To study the morphological changes of anti-Fas antibody-mediated apoptosis in living U251-SP human glioma cells, we employed video-enhanced contrast differential interference contrast (VEC-DIC) microscopy. In our previous study, we investigated the susceptibility of human glioma cell lines to anti-Fas Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody. U251-SP cells express Fas antigen on their surface. The cells exposed to anti-Fas antibody underwent apoptotic cell death, as reported previously. In this study, morphological changes of apoptosis characterized by bleb formation, shrinkage of cells, and nuclear condensation were observed under VEC-DIC microscopy in U251-SP human glioma cells treated with anti-Fas antibody. These results demonstrate the usefulness of VEC-DIC microscopy to study the process of apoptotic cell death.

Key words

Cell death Apoptosis Human glioma cell VEC-DIC microscopy Anti-Fas antibody 

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Copyright information

© The Japan Society of Brain Tumor Pathology 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seiji Ohta
    • 1
  • Jun Yoshida
    • 2
  • Seiji Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Kenichi Uemura
    • 1
  • Toshihiko Wakabayashi
    • 2
  • Masaaki Mizuno
    • 2
  • Takashi Sakurai
    • 3
  • Susumu Terakawa
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryHamamatsu University School of MedicineJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryNagoya University School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  3. 3.Photon Medical Research Center Photonic Cell Biology DepartmentHamamatsu University School of MedicineJapan

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