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Artificial Life and Robotics

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 120–125 | Cite as

Energy-optimal gait analysis of quadruped robots

  • Kazuo Kiguchi
  • Yukihiro Kusumoto
  • Keigo Watanabe
  • Kiyotaka Izumi
  • Toshio Fukuda
Original Article

Abstract

It is important for walking robots such as quadruped robots to have an efficient gait. Since animals and insects are the basic models for most walking robots, their walking patterns are good examples. In this study, the walking energy consumption of a quadruped robot is analyzed and compared with natural animal gaits. Genetic algorithms have been applied to obtain the energy-optimal gait when the quadruped robot is walking with a set velocity. In this method, an individual in a population represents the walking pattern of the quadruped robot. The gait (individual) which consumes the least energy is considered to be the best gait (individual) in this study. The energy-optimal gait is analyzed at several walking velocities, since the amount of walking energy consumption changes if the walking velocity of the robot is changed. The results of this study can be used to decide what type of gait should be generated for a quadruped robot as its walking velocity changes.

Key words

Quadruped robot Optimal gait Energy analysis Animal gait Genetic algorithms 

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Copyright information

© ISAROB 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuo Kiguchi
    • 1
  • Yukihiro Kusumoto
    • 2
  • Keigo Watanabe
    • 1
  • Kiyotaka Izumi
    • 1
  • Toshio Fukuda
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Advanced Systems Control Engineering, Graduate School of Science and EngineeringSaga UniversitySagaJapan
  2. 2.Interior Design Research InstituteFukuoka Indistrial Technology CenterFukuokaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Micro System Engineering, Graduate School of EngineeringNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan

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