Invertebrate Neuroscience

, Volume 3, Issue 2–3, pp 145–153 | Cite as

The L3 neuron and an associated prothoracic network are involved in calling song recognition by female crickets

  • John Stout
  • Nathan Carlson
  • Hilary Bingol
  • James Ramseier
  • Michael Bronsert
  • Gordon Atkins
Articles from the ICINN 97 Conference Sensory Systems

Abstract

In young virginAcheta domesticus females, the spiking response of the prothoracic L3 auditory interneuron discriminates between calling songs (CSs) with phonotactically attractive and unattractive syllable periods (SPs), which parallels phonotactic discrimination. Presentation of a CS with an originally attractive SP, but with the intensity modulated so as to minimize L3's selective response, results in a CS with little phonotactic attractiveness. Conversely, a CS with an originally unattractive SP becomes much more attractive when the CS is intensity modulated in ways that duplicate L3's selective response. L3's discriminatory response to CS SP deteriorates with age, in parallel with decreased phonotactic selectiveness (females, older than 14 days, typically are unselective for CS SPs). SP-selective processing, which was not apparent in these old L3s, is immediately restored by removing the contralateral ear. SP-specific information is resident in a network of neurons within the prothoracic ganglion that results in the SP selective responses of the L3 neuron in young females. Changes in the SP-selective responses of the L3 neuron are highly correlated with corresponding changes in the female's phonotactically selective behavior.

Key Words

L3 neuron Acheta domesticus calling song 

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Copyright information

© Sheffield Academic Press 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Stout
    • 1
  • Nathan Carlson
    • 1
  • Hilary Bingol
    • 1
  • James Ramseier
    • 1
  • Michael Bronsert
    • 1
  • Gordon Atkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Biology DepartmentAndrews UniversityBerrien SpringsUSA

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