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Matériaux et Construction

, Volume 11, Issue 6, pp 424–434 | Cite as

Practical prediction of time-dependent deformations of concrete

Part IV: Temperature effect on basic creep
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Keywords

Portland Cement Ordinary Portland Cement American Concrete Institute Basic Creep Cube Strength 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Secrétariat de Rédaction 1978

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