Environmental Geology

, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp 131–137 | Cite as

Authigenic associations between selected rare earth elements and trace metals in lacustrine sediments

  • Robert M. Owen
  • James E. Mackin
Article

Abstract

Surficial sediment samples were collected at 47 stations in Little Traverse Bay, Lake Michigan, to determine the geochemical associations between certain rare earth elements (REE's) and trace metals. Each sample was analyzed for carbonate carbon, organic carbon, grain size, and the elements Al, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, and Mn. Two distinct Ce subpopulatins were identified by graphical analysis, and an R-mode factor analysis was applied to data from the “enriched” Ce subpopulation (18 samples). Results show that the REE's and trace metals are primarily enriched in the authigenic phase of these sediments. Partial correlation analyses indicate that the REE's are primarily associated with hydrous Fe oxides relative to organic matter in this phase. The ratio of Ce/La concentrations increased markedly from the bay margins to the central trough of the bay, indicating that Ce, similar to Fe, exhibits a variable oxidation state in the authigenic phase of nearshore fine-grained sediments. The results of the present study suggest that the REE's and trace metals behave coherently in the authigenic phase of recent lacustrine sediments, and the REE's may be useful as geochemical tracers to differentiate between trace metal enrichments in surface sediments as a result of diagenesis and pollution loadings.

Keywords

Trace Metal Diagenesis Lacustrine Sediment Great Lake Surficial Sediment 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Owen
    • 1
  • James E. Mackin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic ScienceThe University of MichiganAnn Arbor

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