Fire Technology

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 237–250 | Cite as

Wildland fire modeling and strategy assessment

  • John M. Greenlee
Article

Abstract

The U.S. Forest Service has developed a computer model called FOCUS. The model works by testing various suppression force allocations and positions against an array of historical ignitions.

Keywords

Spread Rate Fuel Type Fire Technology Fire Behavior Fire Fighter 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Albini, F. A. 1976. Estimating wildfire behavior and effects. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, General Technical Report INT-30, Ogden, Utah, p. 92.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bolander, D., J. Carter, D. Dryland, B. Erwin, and B. Gordon. 1972. Brushland management guide for economic analysis: a first approximation of the relative economics of program alternatives. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Region 5, p. 62.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bratten, F. W., J. B. Davis, G. T. Flatman, J. W. Keith, S. R. Rapp, and T. G. Storey. 1981. FOCUS: a fire management planning system—final report. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Berkeley, Cal., General Technical Report PSW-49, p. 34.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Brown, J. K. 1974. Handbook for inventorying downed woody material. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, General Technical Report INT-16, Ogden, Utah, p. 24.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Burgan, R. E. 1979. Fire danger/fire behavior computations with the Texas Instruments TI-59 calculator: user's manual. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, General Technical Report INT-61, Ogden, Utah, p. 25.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Fosberg, M. A. and R. W. Furman. 1973. Fire climates in the southwest.Agricultural Meteorology 12:27–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Greenlee, J. M. and C. C. Wilson. 1979. Cost-effectiveness fire management: a pilot study. Report submitted to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Sequoia National Forest by Fire and Land Management Enterprises, 1129 Western Drive, Santa Cruz, Calif., 95060, p. 276.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Greenlee, J. M. and C. C. Wilson. 1980. Developing a cost-effective fire management plan for California's Kern Plateau.Fire Technology 16(3):165–180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Greenlee, J. M. 1980. A cost-effective method for fire dispatch. Proceedings of the Sixth Conference on Fire and Forest Meteorology April 22–24, 1980. Society of American Foresters, Seattle, Washington, pp. 32–37.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Jischke, M. and J. Shamblin. 1973. A simulation model of suppression, with applications to presuppression decisions. Wildland Fire Management, Volume 1. Summer Faculty Fellowship, Stanford University, Engineering System Division, pp. 191–223.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service. 1969. Fireline Handbook. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, San Francisco, Calif.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 1976. Resistance to control calculations matrix. Region 5 memorandum, 5150 Fuels Management, October 1, 1976. San Francisco, California.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 1978. Fire Behavior Officer's Manual. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, San Francisco, Calif.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 1979. FOCUS (Fire Operations Using Simulation) user manual. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The National Fire Protection Association 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Greenlee

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations