AI & SOCIETY

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 78–87 | Cite as

Emergent functionality among intelligent systems: Cooperation within and without minds

  • Cristiano Castelfranchi
  • Rosaria Conte
Open Forum

Abstract

In this paper, the current AI view that emergent functionalities apply only to the study of subcognitive agents is questioned; a hypercognitive view of autonomous agents as proposed in some AI subareas is also rejected. As an alternative view, a unified theory of social interaction is proposed which allows for the consideration of both cognitive and extracognitive social relations. A notion of functional effect is proposed, and the application of a formal model of cooperation is illustrated. Functional cooperation shows the role of extracognitive phenomena in the interaction of intelligent agents, thus representing a typical example of emergent functionality.

Keywords

Cooperation DAI Emergent functionality 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cristiano Castelfranchi
    • 1
  • Rosaria Conte
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto di Psicologia-CNRRomeItaly

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